Log In


Reset Password

Every book rewritten . . .

Letter

In George Orwell's “1984” he wrote that “Every record has been destroyed or falsified, every book rewritten, every picture has been repainted, every statue and street building has been renamed, every date has been altered. History has stopped.”

In the wake of the Black Lives Matter protests, throughout the US and Great Britain, the Marxist iconoclasts are at work. Statues of Confederate generals and British slave traders have been removed, Penny Lane of Beatles fame is to be renamed as is Gladstone Hall in the University of Liverpool, Churchill's statue in Westminster has been vandalised with graffiti and London Mayor, Sadiq Khan, has announced the creation of a new “Commission for Diversity in the Public Realm” which will examine all London landmarks to decide whether they should be removed or renamed according to the diktats of the commissars.

Interestingly, Hitler wanted Nelson's column removed from Trafalgar Square and taken to Berlin, had the planned Nazi invasion of Britain, Operation Sealion, succeeded, because he knew it was regarded by the British people as a symbol of the country's greatness.

In their quest for totalitarian conformity, the Marxist commissars will not stop at statues. They are going after works of art too. “Gone With the Wind” has disappeared from online circulation. They'll be banning the works of Rudyard Kipling and H.G. Wells soon. Politically incorrect plays and paintings will be next. Let us hope that it doesn't all end up in a Maoist culture war where we are all subjected to “struggle sessions” and ritual humiliation until we subscribe to the prevailing groupthink, as evidenced by the police “taking the knee” in both America and Great Britain.

These civic statues and buildings are all historical artefacts. If you erase them, then there is no history. If there is no history then the Marxist vandals can fill the void with whatever vile claptrap they decide to come up with. That is why the Endeavour models must be reinstated.

Patrick Cooper

Leave a Reply to Gabriel Bruzzi Cancel reply

  1. Tim Wilson, Ohio says:

    Thanks Patrick, a great article of what is happening here in the US. It’s so hard to believe this is happening right before our eyes, and no one is saying or doing anything about it.

    1. Gabriel Bruzzi says:

      We are all part of a past in which in many countries of our cultural origins where there was at least some form of oppression or slavery. But I am glad that America has taught us about our transgressions and the continued struggles that we had into the 20th century. We learned from our past and instituted laws to make equality our mainstream. Some of our past challenges still remained but we were moving in the right direction day by day. Then the advent of the internet came along, it amplified rightly and wrongly what we all feared that our past has come to haunt us. And it was able to be seen instantly; anywhere and any time. We have come so far with very few incidents, but reminders of the negative past have shown their heads and are being used as a political tool against one another. How do we get back on track will be the challenge in this modern, digital-connected world where the number of clicks are more important than the truth. Let’s hope for more of what all of us love; peace and tranquility. We will have to work hard for that!

  2. Annie Greenman, Canada says:

    If you want to talk about history being erased, you cannot ignore the centuries of oppression that countless minorities were subjected to under these “historical heroes”. No one wants to erase the history, but acknowledge the pain that these statues create by glorifying people who traded slaves and treated people so poorly. History is always told by the side of the victor and gives a very biased perspective on how things went down. Please treat people with kindness. Empathy and love are the only things that dignify us as humans and keep society sane. If you really don’t want history to be erased, please educate yourself on what you weren’t taught in school and open your heart to see other points of view.
    Riots are the voice of the unheard. If silent protests have failed to prove the point to those who won’t listen, more extreme measures must be taken to genuinely be heard.

    1. Patrick Cooper says:

      But please remember that slavery was practised by the Arab merchants on the East African coast who shipped black slaves to the Arabian peninsula ((Muscat) for hundreds of years before the European nations were involved. The Barbary slave traders in the Mediterranean too, under the suzerainty of the Ottoman Empire, enslaved over a million Europeans from raiding in England, Ireland, France and the Netherlands from the middle of the 16th century to the middle of the 18th century. Why is it that we never see protests about the trade in those countries? Don’t forget that various African chiefs connived at the trade by raiding neighbouring villages and delivering their captives to the coast to sell to the slave traders. Shouldn’t they be held accountable? Slavery was endemic in Africa before the arrival of European slave traders.

    2. Bob Rooney, Los Angeles says:

      Great discussion guys!

      I just wanted to also point out that the black community isn’t really mad about slavery. That is the least of our problems. We wouldn’t have anything to say if our problem was just “SLAVERY BAD”. The problem is more so that it didn’t stop after slavery. After it was abolished white folk found any reason to imprison Black people to work for them again. After that was abolished Jim Crow happened and housing discrimination soon after. When we are talking about 400 years of discrimination we are quite literally talking about non-stop four centuries worth of kidnapping, lynching, bombing, endangering and murdering black people.

      You say that we are similar to Ingsoc when you say we are taking your history but I believe it is the other way around. When print companies use pictures of Martin Luther King Jr in black and white for textbooks it shows young kids that it was a long time ago when in reality it was a year before the Jackson Five debuted. When we see our local police murder our brothers and sisters to only throw out the case it is exactly like vaporization in Orwell’s novel.

      Patrick, I believe you are a very intelligent and open-minded man and I thank you for opening this discussion. I think it is very important. By the way, I think they should keep Gone with the Wind around, since that was the first time a black person ever won an Oscar.

    3. Claudia Stocker, California says:

      Thanks Annie for your insight. It’s true so many of us have not educated ourselves. I have taken a little time to review some of the history of WWII and it is frightening to think of what could have happened. Our nation came together during that time even though our Japanese and Black Americans were not treated with respect. So many lives lost and still we were segregated. That was wrong. We do need to listen and work together for better futures for our children, so that no one lives in fear. I don’t believe more extreme measures should be taken to be heard, as that will insight war. We don’t need to draw down on each other. We need to come together so our children won’t be forced into slavery of another country while we aren’t looking outside our little world.

  3. Nicholas Campos, São Paulo, Brazil says:

    Perfect words, Patrick!
    Unfortunately, it’s the new reality we must endure and struggle against. Hopefully people will wake up from this at some point…

  4. PJ Reed says:

    The further we move from 1984, the closer we get to Orwell’s 1984.